Tag Archive | Volunteering

Volunteer Week Celebration

I have a true penchant for our magnificent city of Birmingham. Even after travelling the world and experiencing the splendour of the South Pacific, Europe and Caribbean I still found my true heart was back in Brum.

Birmingham has so many wonders to be experienced, from our diverse cultural quarters, our proud industrial legacy, our deeply engraved historical heritage, our numerous parklands, our copious canal system, our vibrant social and culinary scene and of course our beloved and cherished museums and art galleries.

I am not the only one with a love for Birmingham though. There are a dedicated group of individuals who unite in their passion for Birmingham and they give up their precious time and resources to volunteer for the various sites of Birmingham Museums Trust (BMT). This band of devoted and fervent volunteers create memorable moments for visitors at BMT sites and they instil a new pride in the city of Birmingham. These volunteers do this selflessly out of enthusiasm and desire for the legacy and future of Birmingham; they ask for nothing in return but the satisfaction that they are making a true difference to the city’s prospects, success and its heritage.

So when Alex Nicholson-Evans (Volunteer Development Officer at Birmingham Museums) decided to formally recognise all the volunteers of Birmingham Museums during National Volunteer Week and celebrate their contribution, it was a real honour.

Some of the Birmingham Museum Trust volunteers

Some of the Birmingham Museum Trust volunteers

We were truly treated and indulged to a full tour of Aston Hall, even areas not visited by the public, by Barbara Nomikos (Property Supervisor at Aston Hall) whose knowledge and enthusiasm for the house and resident families was sincerely inspirational, compelling and exhaustive. The indulgence continued with a magnificent picnic washed down with lashings of Pimms! Alas, the event had been planned as a picnic on the lawn but the UK weather had other plans and an onslaught of good old British rain, saw us camped out above the newly renovated stable block. However the weather could not dampen out valiant volunteering spirits and a fabulous time was had by all. To round of such a spectacular day we were subjected to, sorry enjoyed, an amusing and entertaining quiz! All in all a wonderfully memorable and very appreciated day.

Volunteers taking part in the quiz

Volunteers taking part in the quiz

So I would like to thank Alex, Rachel, Barbara, the team at Aston Hall and all the volunteers who attended in making us all feel so valued and appreciated. Although we volunteer out of love and passion, this kind of recognition is greatly respected and continues to fire our hunger and desire for volunteering.

Thanks to the dedication of people like Alex who make us all feel special and appreciated, we will keep on standing side by side and continue our volunteer work, ensuring we uphold and endorse Birmingham as the truly magnificent city it is.

The volunteer 'picnic' at Aston Hall

The volunteer ‘picnic’ at Aston Hall

Phil Mellanby,
Volunteer

For more information about volunteering or to be added to our volunteer list visit: bmag.org.uk/support-us/volunteer

Archaeological Finds Volunteers

Today’s blog post comes from the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS). For those of you who may not know, the Portable Antiquities Scheme is a voluntary scheme for archaeological objects found by members of the public. The scheme encourages finders to record these discoveries with their local Finds Liaison Officer, who will then record the objects onto the national database for researchers to study and the public to view. As a general rule, items over 300 years old are recorded but if an item is of significant interest and should be recorded, then it will be.

We have 3 volunteers giving their time at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery to support the team in photographing and recording new finds. The volunteers work with Teresa, our Finds Liaison Officer who is based here at Birmingham Museum. Teresa writes:

“Volunteers are incredibly useful for us, and all the other Finds Liaison Officers based around the country, as they help us manage our large workloads. Tasks that our volunteers have undertaken include: photographing archaeological finds; photo-editing; identification and recording of archaeological finds of all kinds; illustration of archaeological finds and research into different artefacts and distributions”.

One of the volunteer at work

One of the volunteers at work

Riccardo, one of the volunteers, writes:

“I come from Italy and I started volunteering with the Portable Antiquities Scheme in March 2014. During this period I worked on different finds taking photographs and setting them for the database. Last week I started to insert into the database some objects which I had worked on, many of which were Roman coins. I studied Archaeology in Italy with a particular interest in the Western Roman Provinces and it is fantastic for me to have the possibility to handle and study Roman materials from Britain. Apart from that, I am finding it very interesting discovering a world of archaeological materials which I hadn’t dealt with before such as those of Medieval and Post-Medieval period. I took advantage of this to learn more about the English History.  Joining the PAS volunteering team, I am experiencing the policy on the metal detectorists’ activity in England and Wales, and how it is useful in providing the registration of the finds.

I am definitely learning more about using editing software in order to manipulate the pictures of the objects and most of all I am acquiring the analytical method of identifying and cataloguing them.

I am really enjoying this experience in a good environment with experienced and helpful people.”

Riccardo, one of the volunteers, at work

Riccardo, one of the volunteers, at work

We aren’t recruiting for more volunteers within PAS at the moment but if you’d like to be added to our volunteer interest list just email alex.nicholson-evans@birminghammuseums.org.uk and we’ll let you know as and when we launch new roles.

Alex Nicholson-Evans,Volunteer Development Officer,
Teresa Gilmore, Finds Lisiaon Office,
Riccardo Caravello, Archaeological Finds Recording Assistants

Volunteering at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

Art is something I have always had an immense amount of interest in; from an early age I was reading about artists, visiting galleries and getting involved in every art class I could find. Pursuing courses in art at school, I became more interested in looking at other’s art works rather than creating my own, and thinking about the historical, biographical and social contexts of works. When the time came for me to leave school I stumbled on information about courses of History of Art. This seemed perfect for me, so I decided to take the plunge. Once I had finished my course I moved back to Birmingham and for the first time was at a loss for what to do with my future. I greatly missed the challenge of academic study, and spent a while thinking about my future and what I wanted to achieve. I knew it would have to be something art based, but I wasn’t sure what job it was that I wanted exactly, or even how to embark upon a career in which I had no practical experience. After many unsuccessful job applications, I decided the best course of action was to go back to what I knew I enjoyed the most: visiting art galleries. It was then I saw the vacancy for volunteer positions at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, and I sent an application without any real hope that I would be accepted due to my lack of experience. However, I couldn’t believe my luck when I was told I had been successful!

Kendall enjoying a visit to an exhibition

Kendall enjoying a visit to an exhibition

Volunteering has become an essential part of my weekly routine. Being at the gallery twice a week has renewed my interest and passion in art; spending time talking to the public and answering their questions about pieces in the collection pushes me to constantly expand my knowledge. Many questions and opinions that arise in general conversation are things I had not considered myself, and I love being educated by others who are as enthusiastic about the works in the gallery as I am. Volunteering in a gallery like the Staffordshire Hoard often draws in people with specialist knowledge, and it is so inspiring and reassuring to see the passion and sense of pride that local people feel for their art gallery. I really try to pass on any small amount of knowledge I may have so that others might find the same appreciation for the art as I do.

Recently I spent an afternoon at an object handling session with Ancient Egyptian objects. It was a fantastic experience for me to engage with families, and in particular children, in one of my areas of great interest. Using the objects to interact with the public was a really rewarding experience for me, as it helped to draw people in for conversations. The opportunity for us to touch actual artefacts was a real treat, and it really helped to create a strong connection and understanding of the art, especially for children. It was so gratifying to see people really understanding the objects on show, not only on a visual level but by physically exploring the objects to reaffirm their understanding of them, for example, being able to examine a kohl pot with remnants of makeup in it expanded understanding of the object on a deeper level than being told of its use by display information.

Every day volunteering at the gallery is enjoyable, spending time around such beautiful and amazing works of art has led me to develop a deep appreciation for all the works, and it is a real pleasure to speak to all the staff and hear their own experiences of working in the gallery. The building itself is a work of art, and a pleasure to spend time in. I hope to volunteer until a more permanent career path becomes more obvious to me; until then I will continue to enthusiastically drag my friends and family, such as my sister pictured below, to the gallery to experience what amazing things Birmingham is lucky enough to be home to.

Kendall's sister at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

Kendall’s sister at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

For more information about volunteering at Birmingham Museums visit: bmag.org.uk/support-us/volunteer

By Kendall Russell,
Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery Volunteer

 

Stories from the Mill

A lovely blog about volunteer millers at Sarehole Mill.

Sarehole Mill will open again for the season on Saturday 12 April 2014. Please see http://www.bmag.org.uk/sarehole-mill for more details.

The Iron Room

I used to think I had the best job in the world, education & outreach officer at Birmingham Archives & Heritage; a sublime mix of delving into the past through archival documents and photos and working with young people and community groups to document their lives and our changing city.

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Then in January I answered the call for volunteer millers at Sarehole Mill.  Suddenly every waking thought was about millstones and wheel revolutions, about chutes, tuns, hoppers and damsels and I found myself in a new world of the old.  Now of course it all makes sense; a seamless path from researching and recording stories about Birmingham’s history to real life hands on experience.

I am part of a team of volunteers learning how to operate the mill following it’s major  £450,000 restoration and refurbishment project.  Sarehole Mill is one of only two surviving working watermills in Birmingham (…

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Volunteering in the Staffordshire Hoard Gallery

“Where’s the big stuff? I want to see the really big stuff”. It was a familiar request; visitors to gallery sixteen at Birmingham Museum are often a little thrown when they peer in to the glass cases for the first time and wonder what on earth they’re looking at. Small pieces of shiny metal, many of them studded with red gemstones – what are they? Who do they belong to? Where are they from?  Why has such a fuss been made in the media about this find?

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My name is Donna, and I’m only one of a group of volunteer interpreters who staff the Hoard at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.  Our primary role involves answering questions about the Hoard and encouraging visitors to engage with the objects on display. Volunteers are all passionate about the collection, for different reasons. Most of us are graduates; some of us are still studying. We all give our time freely, well almost freely – we do get a cuppa and a biscuit during breaks!

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Photo: Two Staffordshire Hoard gallery volunteers at the 2012 Volunteer Party

So what do volunteers in the Hoard gallery do? Well, there’s a bit of housekeeping for starters. First thing in the morning we set the gallery up: we turn on the lights, set up the ipads and, last of all, fire up the short documentary which is a great introduction to the Hoard. Visitors often ask if we know the script of that film off by heart: we do!  There is a small amount of paperwork, a gallery check to make sure all is working, clean and tidy for visitors and then…we wait.

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There is never much of a wait before the first visitors arrive. The Staffordshire Hoard remains very popular, and totting up the numbers is another volunteer responsibility. We regularly log over 300 visitors, even on a rainy weekday. There is rarely a dull moment in the Hoard, and our visitors are always so interesting, as well as interested.  For me this is the best part of volunteering: the opportunity to talk with such a diverse range of people. I started volunteering in the Hoard in January 2012, and since then I’ve learned as much from the public as I have from books and documentaries. I’ve been privileged to speak with jewellers who understand the intricate complexity of the filigree work; with metal workers who have explained how the swords would have been made and even an expert in marine life who enlightened me on sea horses off the south coast of England.

But you don’t have to be an expert at anything to appreciate the Hoard (I’m certainly not!) or to engage our full attention. There is still so much mystery surrounding the find and, as I often tell visitors, everyone’s interpretation is as good as anyone else’s when it comes to the Staffordshire Hoard. One of the really nice things about working in the gallery is hearing the ideas about how the gold came to be stashed there, and why. It seems unlikely that we’ll never know, but a very happy ten minutes can be passed debating it.

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The day passes very quickly as a conglomeration of chatty, enthusiastic school trips, overseas tourists and mooching couples pass through the gallery. And there are quiet times too, during which we go around with a cloth and wipe the fingerprints off the cases.  At five o’clock a call comes over the radio advising that it’s time to start closing down the interactive exhibits, and Terry Herbert utters his final ‘why me?’ of the day. The lights are turned down, the doors closed and it’s time to head home.

If you are planning a visit to the Staffordshire Hoard – and why wouldn’t you? It’s fab and free! – please take advantage of the volunteer interpreters in the gallery. We can’t promise to answer all of your questions, but we’ll have an interesting time together trying!

Donna Taylor
Staffordshire Hoard Volunteer

For more information about the Staffordshire Hoard please visit: staffordshirehoard.org.uk

From Volunteer to Documentation Manager with Volunteers!

Hi, I’m Lucy Blakeman and I’m the Documentation Manager at BMAG. I started my museum career at the Barber Institute of Fine Art, working with the Education Manager. To gain more Curatorial experience I also volunteered at BMAG in the Art Department with Tessa Sidey and then in the History Department with Phil Watson. Having gained experience in several different areas of museum work, it became apparent that I was leaning more towards documentation and after 2.5 years volunteering I took my first paid role as a Documentation Officer at BMAG and haven’t looked back!

My experience as a volunteer has helped me see the value in volunteering from a personal perspective as well as from an institutional perspective. I now take on volunteers of my own as I feel it’s essential to my work in at BMAG, as well as providing keen up-and-coming-museum-professionals with the experience they need to get museum jobs.

I have 2 long-term volunteers that work on Documentation projects with me – Misaho, who has also written a blog about volunteering today, is one of them and has been coming to BMAG for 3 years now. Her work is of an exceptional standard and she is dedicated and professional, which is exactly what we need. Without Misaho I wouldn’t be on target with our collections audit, we wouldn’t have solved many of the documentation anomalies that have occurred over the years, and her expertise in Ancient History is a real bonus in solving these.

I also work with four of the Friends as part of their 80th Birthday celebrations this year. They have been inputting funding data and accurate credit line info for all the objects that the Friends have helped us acquire over the last 80 years. Working closely with the Friends has been a lovely experience – several of them have been a part of BMAG for much longer than me, and although I may have taught them a few new skills, they have also taught me a great deal.

Documentation is one of the most important aspects of collections work and without the help and hard work of volunteers we wouldn’t have the level of documentation that we currently do. I can’t thank volunteers enough for the work that they do.

Thank you very much all you fabulous volunteers!

 

Volunteering for the Documentation Team at BMAG

My name is Misaho and I have been volunteering for the  Documentation Office of BMAG for 3 years now. I was always interested in history, arts and culture, and wanted to work in the museum sector.  

I applied for postgraduate Museum Studies course in distance learning from the University of Leicester because I wanted to gain the practical experience of a real working environment at the same time. The great thing about being a volunteer while studying was that it helped me greatly to understand academic theories as practical ones. Also I was able to ask questions and get lots of advice and tips from my supervisors and the staff to do my assignments!

Currently, I am helping the Museum’s on-going auditing project at the Museum Collections Centre. I check the existing objects with the database records and update any changes. I take responsibility for resolving numbering issues that arise and also make new entries to the database by researching the objects. 

I have also been able to gain experience from other departments such as the Conservation Department and the Events Team. This has made me understand the various types of jobs available in museums. The Museum also gives me opportunities to attend training courses and these have been very useful. 

I’m now looking for a job as a documentation officer. It is difficult time to be looking for a museum job but I hope that I succeed, and until then I will continue to develop my skill and experience professionally as a volunteer.