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Adventures in Time and Space

moon

Matthew Boulton was a founding member of the Lunar Society. The group were made up of 14 members who would meet once a month during a full moon. These meetings would often take place at Boulton’s home, Soho House, in the dining room, now known as The Lunar Room. The group was comprised of some of the greatest minds of the period and contributed to scientific understanding.

Original table that the Lunar Society sat at.

The Lunar Room at Soho House with the original table that the Lunar Society sat at.

The other founding member was Doctor Erasmus Darwin. Physician, botanist, zoologist and grandfather of Charles Darwin. An enormous man in both personality and stature, Darwin had an enormous appetite for ‘natural philosophy’ and scientific discovery. In his most famous work ‘Zoonomia’ Darwin anticipated natural selection. He is also credited with inventing a steering device for his carriage that would be adopted for cars more than 130 years later.

Erasmus Darwin's portrait

Erasmus Darwin’s portrait displayed in Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

Darwin's study at Erasmus Darwin Museum, Lichfield

Darwin’s study at Erasmus Darwin Museum, Lichfield

Like Darwin, Boulton was also fascinated by the beauty that occurred in the natural world and kept a fossilry at Soho House. This room has specially commissioned cabinets which hold forty specimens drawers for Boulton’s vast collection of fossils and minerals.

Drawer with shells

Drawer with shells in the fossilry at Soho House

Variety of minerals

Variety of minerals from Soho House

Other members of the Lunar society included Josiah Wedgewood, best known for his beautiful pottery and skill as a chemist; Joseph Priestley who discovered several ‘airs’ including oxygen and invented soda water; James Watt, Boulton’s business partner at Soho and engineer who improved the efficiency of the steam engine.

Statue of James Watt

Statue of James Watt in Chamberlain square, Birmingham

Statues of Joseph Priestley

Statue of Joseph Priestley in Chamberlain square, Birmingham

The collection at Soho House reflects the interests and contributions Boulton and the Lunar Society made to 18th century Britain.

Some of the Wedgewood collection at Soho House

Some of the Wedgewood collection at Soho House

The collection at Soho also includes several time pieces. The pendulum clock was invented in 1656, only a century before Soho House was built. The longcase clock (also known as the grandfather clock) was first created to house the pendulum and works by the English clockmaker William Clement in 1670 or 1671.

Grandfather clock at Soho House

Grandfather clock at Soho House

The most famous clock in the collection is the Ormolu Clock. A popular style in France, ormolu is the process of grinding gold, mixing it with mercury and gilding it to bronze and other metals at high temperature. There are two ormolu time pieces at Soho, the most famous being the Sidereal Clock in the Drawing Room. Sidereal time uses the position of a star to measure the days, hours and minutes. The star will be found in nearly the same location on another night at the same sidereal time. However, unlike solar time which relies upon the sun, sidereal is much more exact. A sidereal day is about 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.0916 seconds. It does not account for longer days depending on the earths position, nor leap years. The exactness of sidereal time is most probably is reason it never gained in popularity.

Gold ormolu sidereal clock

Gold ormolu sidereal clock at Soho House

As well as treasures from the land, Boulton looked to the skies for answers to the world around him. Astronomy and meteorology were two of his passions. The earliest recorded working telescopes were the refracting telescopes developed by Lippershey, Janssen and Metius in 1608 in the Netherlands and soon after improved by Galileo.

Originally Boulton intended to have an observatory built in the grounds of Soho House, but for what ever reason this was never fully realised. He did however have a telescope positioned on the roof of the house. He was so obsessed with keeping weather records that when away on business his daughter Anne would observe changes for him. In his twilight years he still insisted on viewing the stars from the roof, even on bitterly cold nights.

Boulton's study

Boulton’s study at Soho House, with lunar globe on desk. Boulton kept meticulous lists of his scientific equipment

The land around Soho House was slowly sold acre at a time by Bouton’s grandson. A inner city built up area today, the views enjoyed by Boulton in the 18th century would have been very rural. You can experience a taste of this on the  Heritage Open Weekend (13th and 14th of September) when we will be offering free rooftop tours.

View from the roof of Soho House

View from the roof of Soho House

Another view from the roof of Soho House

Another view from the roof of Soho House

We will also be celebrating the achievements and inventions of the Lunar Society on 6th September with a free family event ‘Crazy Science‘.

crazy science

A frame advertising the free ‘Crazy Science’ event at Soho House on Saturday 6th Sept

For more information on all upcoming events at Soho House visit: www.bmag.org.uk/events

Louise Deakin,
Visitor Services Assistant,
Soho House

Nurse Teddy at the Ready

I am lucky enough to be a volunteer at Blakesley Hall, the dearest little Tudor gem out in Yardley surrounded by its own garden oasis, just bliss.

Blakesley Hall

Blakesley Hall

Here at Blakesley Hall we have all sorts of events going on for children, from Totstime Tuesday to Crafty Thursday. But the one that appealed to me above all was held on National Play Day 6th August and that was ‘Teddy Bears parachuting Picnic’ complete with a teddy bear hospital. I begged to be allowed to come in to help on that day as it sounded such fun and oh I love teddies. I was so very pleased to take part that I jumped at the chance when asked to become Nurse Teddy in charge of the teddy bear hospital. Here is my account of a happy sunny day enjoyed by the Blakesley Hall team.

I arrived early (as all good volunteers should), the sun was already high in the sky and everybody scurrying around, tables being moved outside and teddy parachute wire in place. My position of choice was in the corridor that leads to the outside world but also looks down on the reception area so good vantage point to say hello to teddies and minders. My table was set up with Maddies help and I donned my ‘uniform’, an apron covered in teddy bears and a mini teddy bear as a ‘fob watch’ and finally my official museum name badge of course. I had bought with me my teddy sick bed complete with pine bed, bedding and ‘sick’ rabbit to use as a conversation piece. I had travelled by bus with all this with much hilarity (one bus driver asked if I was leaving home). I straightened the bedding, checked my badge machine was in place and doctors kit by my side then a quick nod and thumbs up from Kim and we were open for business.

Nurse Teddy

Nurse Teddy

Within moments the children, Mums, Dads and assorted adults were flooding in complete with regulation teddies, dollies, dinosaurs, monkeys and all sorts of wonderful furry shaped objects. The sun had put a smile on everyone’s face and the children charged out into the fresh air looking for the hidden teddies in the grounds or eager for their own loved furry to fly. One or two shy ones hung back and it was then I was able to tell them the secret of the rabbit sitting in the teddy bed pretending to be a teddy (but don’t tell anyone).

Nurse Teddy with rabbit

Nurse Teddy with the secret rabbit

For a little while I was only saying hello and explaining that after teddy had ‘flown’ do come and get him checked out. But very soon they were flooding back to have ted examined. If you want to examine a teddy for any injuries this is how you do it. Reassure owner, lie teddy, monkey etc. on back flex arms and legs, check eyes and head for bumps however this can altered, reduced or changed if a queue. Pronounce teddy fit or in need of a cuddle or two and then make a ‘Brave Blakesley Bear’ badge and send child on their way. Fortunately we had no serious injuries as everybody knows teddies bounce.

Teddy ready to parachute out of the window at Blakesley Hall

Teddy getting ready to parachute out of the window

Teddy parachuting out of the window at Blakesley Hall

Teddy parachuting out of the window at Blakesley Hall

Some funny things did happen during the day. Two woman unconnected bought antique teddies to be examined by me to see if they could be mended in the mistaken belief that we had a fully functioning dolls hospital. With one of the ladies I had this very surreal conversation about not being set up for extensive surgery but eager to please I gave her an overview of how to mend the teds wobbly leg and we decided between us maybe he shouldn’t be flown.

Teddy landing safely on the ground

Teddy back safely on the ground

One child insisted on having six plasters on her ted, he could hardly breathe, what is it with plasters and children? Later in the afternoon one three year old carefully dragged the giant panda off that had been sitting in the entrance hall and left her tiny teddy in its place fair swops she thought.

Late into the afternoon when everybody was flagging I had a last minute rush the teddies, plasters, bandages and badges were fairly flying out. I did pause for a moment and think with a longing for home and tea. Then I thought naa this is much more fun out at Blakesley Hall with the team being silly surrounded by sun burnt happy faces!

Carol Hague,
Volunteer at Blakesley Hall

For more information about events at Blakesley Hall visit: www.bmag.org.uk/events and information about volunteering can be found at: www.bmag.org.uk/support-us/volunteer

 

The Curation Game

Are you a fan of art? We’d like you to join us  to play ‘The Curation Game’ at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

‘The Curation Game’ lets you have a go at curating your own display, whilst at the same, helping to shape the future appearance of the galleries.

The ‘Game’ is very simple: choose as many paintings and objects as you want, and arrange them into your own exhibition. Group works by theme, colour, place, date – it’s up to you!

Next choose your interpretation – do you want facts and figures, or videos and photographs? This is your chance to tell us what makes the perfect display.

By playing the ‘Game’ you will help us with our re-display of the 17th Century galleries. We want to figure out what people like and dislike about 17th Century art, and what helps visitors to make the most of their experience here.

St Andrew Praying before his Martyrdom by Carlo Dolci.

St Andrew Praying before his Martyrdom by Carlo Dolci.

Join Us

You can play ‘The Curation Game’ in Gallery 25 at BMAG on:

 Friday 22nd August, 2pm-4pm

Thursday 28th August, 11am-1pm

Come along and play, or just pop by for a chat and find out more about the 17th Century project.

More information can be found on-line at http://birminghambaroque.wordpress.com/ 

Helen Hillyard

National Gallery Curatorial Trainee at Birmingham Museums

 

Bostin Austen at Soho House

Now in it’s third year, Jane Austen Day is celebrated each summer at Soho House museum and this year’s celebration took place just over a week ago. Although Austen herself never visited Boulton’s home, the Georgian property provides the perfect setting to bring the world of her novels to life.

Austen was a novelist whose works earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Georgian society is the backdrop of all of Austen’s novels. Set during the reign of George III, they describe everyday lives, social hierarchies, gender roles, marriage, and the pastimes of well-off families. They provide an insight to the English society of this period.

group soho jane austen day

Staff and volunteers at Soho House on Jane Austen Day

Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry. The support of her family was critical to her development as a professional writer. Her father was a clergyman and after his death, she, her mother and unmarried sister Casandra went to live in a cottage on her brother’s estate. Cassandra was Austen’s closest friend and confidante throughout her life. It was in these later years Austen successfully published four novels which were generaly well-received: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park and Emma. These works were published anonymously and brought her little personal fame. Austen’s most famous work remains Pride and Prejudice. In this novel her most beloved heroine Elizabeth Bennet must navigate the complexities of life as a young woman of limited dowry. During Jane Austen Day Pattern 23 performed famous scenes from Austen’s books, including Mr. Collins ill conceived marriage proposal to Elizabeth.

Pattern 23 performing proposal scene from Pride and Prejudice.

Pattern 23 performing Mr. Collin’s/Elizabeth Bennett proposal scene from Pride and Prejudice.

When Jane Austen’s characters talk about buying a dress, it means in fact that they are going to buy the necessary fabric, which they will then give to a dressmaker who will make a dress to their specifications. Patterns for dresses in the latest London fashion were found in all the women’s fashion newspapers. In ‘Emma’ Harriet Smith buys muslin cloth with this intention. For Jane Austen Day I asked a friend to make a Regency gown for me to wear. During the day there were also period hair and make-up demonstrations carried out by Julie Stevens.

georgian hair and make up

Period hair and make-up demonstrations

20140718_114123_resized

Period dress I wore on Jane Austen Day.

Austen’s plots, though fundamentally comic, highlight the dependence of women on marriage to secure social standing and economic security. A woman would have belonged in the first instance to her father and later her husband. She would have been legally subordinate to him, without rights and would not even have even been able to choose where she lived.

All members of the Lunar Society, who regularly met at Soho House, were committed to the idea of education, but what that meant for daughters and wives tended to be different from what it meant for sons. The subjects both Jane Austen and Matthew Boulton’s only daughter, Anne studied formed the main elements of the typical middle-class young woman’s curriculum. While away at school, Anne studied English, French, drawing, history and geography. Later, she learnt music from a Mr Harris in Birmingham, botany from Boulton’s friend Dr William Withering, and embroidery from Mary Linwood, a celebrated embroiderer of so-called ‘needle paintings’. Austen has been described by biographers as an accomplished seamstress and was very fond of dancing. These education topics were highlighted during Austen Day, with embroidery and dancing demonstrations for visitors to take part in.

Visitors learning Regency dance steps.

Visitors learning Regency dance steps.

textile group

Asian Women’s Textile Group are a community group based at Soho House.

Jane Austen acquired the remainder of her education by reading books, guided by her father and her brothers and had unlimited access both to her father’s library and that of her uncle. Like all gentry of the day, letter writing was a favoured and necessary past-time. In an uncharacteristic letter, the usually kind Anne Boulton is scathing about an expected visitor (in tone similar to Austen’s much-loved character Emma Woodhouse):

‘She is neither young, or handsome, has what some people call a pleasing cast with one eye, talks a great deal and would be glad to be thought young, notwithstanding wrinkles and grey hair begin to appear, but with all these perfections and imperfections she is I am told a sensible and entertaining woman.’

 Anne Boulton's writing desk at Soho House.

Anne Boulton’s writing desk at Soho House.

Unlike Austen, Anne was not dependent on the kindness and charity of her brother and relations after the death of her father in 1809. Boulton laid his plans well: ‘I propose to set apart, in my lifetime, as much money, land, stock or good securities as will be sufficient to support my daughter handsomely and comfortable’

Boulton left Anne a combined fortune of £34,000, enabling her to move from Soho in 1818 to a house of her own after her brother married. At Thornhill she kept a very comfortable but modest home. Upon her death in 1829 she left each of her servants one years wages, plus a further £20 each for the two longest-serving. Land she had purchased and the remainder of her fortune she left to ‘my dear brother to whom I now bid a long and last farewell.’

Jane Austen continues to be a huge influence on popular culture and this year’s celebration at Soho House was a great success. Staff, volunteers and visitors had fun immersing themselves in Austen’s stories, etiquette, interests and wit.

Louise Deakin,
Visitor Services Assistant,
Soho House

Quotes: The Hardware Man’s Daughter by Shena Mason, published by Phillimore & Co Ltd, 2005.

#Staticstilllife – Share your still life artworks

Here at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (BMAG) we are all excited about the opening of our latest exhibition ‘STATIC: Still Life Reconsidered’. The exhibition explores the art of still life so we want to see your still life creations!

Whether through photography, paint or sculpture, whether you’re a budding artist or a professional, we want you to share your still life artwork with us! Simply snap an image of your very own still life and post it with the hashtag #staticstilllife on Twitter or @STATIC_STILL_LIFE on instagram!

Selected work will then be featured on the plasma screen to the entrance of Waterhall throughout July to September for all our visitors to see. You can check out your piece as well as many others at @BM_AG and @thinktank.

Flowers and a Jug by William George Scott.

Flowers and a Jug byWilliam George Scott.
© 2014 William Scott Foundation / Photo © Birmingham Museums Trust.

The ‘STATIC: Still Life Reconsidered’ exhibition is on at the Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, from the 26th July- 31st December. For more information visit; www.bmag.org.uk/events?id=3304

We look forward to seeing your still life creations!

Charlotte Dunn,
Marketing Officer

Images hashtagged #staticstilllife will be featured in the slide show. The still lives featured will be chosen by the marketing team at Birmingham Museums. No correspondence will be entered into about the choice of the Still Lives featured.

The entries to the slideshow will be chosen from twitter and Facebook at the end of each month. We may also feature entry images on the BMAG Pinterest page. You retain all rights in, and are solely responsible for, the content you post. When you send your images to Birmingham Museums, it still belongs to you but we can show it to people and others can share it on different social media platforms.

For more details see full terms and conditions.

 

 

Half Term at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery

We are getting ready for what will hopefully be a very busy holiday week at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Our theme this half term is Animals and there will be lots for families to see and do.

Every day of half term (17th-21st February) we have two exciting drop in activities taking place:

  • In the Learning Zone you can meet some amazing real animals from Animalmania, the mobile zoo (on 18th and 21st) and the Minibeast Roadshow (on 17th, 19th and 20th) between 11am-1pm and 2pm-4pm each day. You can even hold some of them if you are feeling brave enough! (£1 per person)
  • In the Activity Zone families can work with local artist Lucy Read to make and decorate their own animal puppets (on 17th, 19th and 21st) or bearded dragon character to take home (on 18th and 20th), between 11am-1pm and 2pm-4pm, daily. These activities are designed for families to take part in together and all ages are welcome. (£1 per child)

You can also pick up a copy of our free Animals in Art trail from the animal handling activities or from the vestibule reception desk.

Art activity: decorate a bearded dragon

We also have two hour artist led workshops for children looking for a more in depth activity and to improve their artistic skills (on 19th and 20th Feb). Please book online in advance for this session (morning or afternoon workshops available). £5 per child, suitable for ages 7 and over. 

For further details of events and activities for families across all of Birmingham Museums sites please visit www.bmag.org.uk/events

(Please note that children must be supervised by a responsible adult at all times.)

Sarah Walker
Informal Learning Officer

A Squash and a Squeeze – meeting Axel Scheffler

My name is Sarah and I am an Informal Learning Officer at Birmingham Museums.  I have being doing a lot of work with our family visitors and this summer I have been lucky enough to be involved with A Squash and a Squeeze exhibition.

A Squash and a Squeeze exhibition

This summer we ran a very busy and very fun events programme which involved all sorts of activities, from children making their own Gruffalo masks, dancing to Julia Donaldson’s songs and illustrating their own books to babies painting just like in the book Cave Baby! It has been fantastic to see lots of happy families enjoying the exhibition together and to welcome so many very young visitors to the museum.

One of the highlights of the exhibition has to be meeting the illustrator Axel Scheffler when he recently visited the exhibition.

Sarah with Axel Scheffler

Axel did a public appearance in the morning where he read three of Julia Donaldson’s stories and did some impromptu illustrations.  It was amazing to see the room fall silent when he started to draw, the audience were captivated, even very young children.

Axel Scheffler illustrating in front of a crowd

In the afternoon Axel signed books for our visitors and even created a unique mini illustration for each visitor – something very special which I’m sure our visitors will treasure.

Axel Scheffler drawing characters from Room on the Broom

There are lots more events planned for the exhibition including a special visit from Julia Donaldson on Monday 7th October from 2pm – 3.30pm. For more information please visit: http://www.bmag.org.uk/events?id=2927

Sarah Walker,
Informal Learning Officer